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saturday snippets

pinus succinifera is extinct yet his fossil resin or amber is still being found and used medicinally. amber necklaces are used to soothe teething babies. when amber is rubbed on clothing, it causes static electricity and can remove lint!

saturday snippets

pine trees are mainly found in the northern hemisphere but have been introduced to temperate portions of the southern hemisphere where they have become invasive.

saturday snippets

hardened pine resin has been used as an emergency dental filling. i pity the dentist who has to remove it!

saturday snippets

rosemary was used at funerals and religious ceremonies and was a traditional new year’s gift combined with a cloved orange. rosemary is such a versatile herb, isn’t she!

saturday snippets

did you know?! it takes 100 pounds of flowering rosemary tops to make 8 ounces of rosemary essential oil! that’s a lot of herb.

saturday snippets

in early times, rosemary was freely cultivated in kitchen gardens and came to represent the dominant influence of the house mistress: “where rosemary flourished, the woman ruled.”

saturday snippets

historically, rosemary was woven into a wreath that was worn by the bride. a rosemary branch decorated with silken threads was presented to wedding guests as a symbol of love and loyalty.

saturday snippets

lemon balm’s botanical name ‘melissa’ is derived from a greek word meaning bee.

saturday snippets

the london dispensary (1696) says: ‘an essence of balm, given in canary wine, every morning will renew youth, strengthen the brain, relieve languishing nature and prevent baldness.’

saturday snippets

lemon balm’s leaves contain very little essential oil. however, growing her in extremely hot and dry conditions can increase the amount of oil to 2-3 times higher than normal.

saturday snippets

one of the earliest medicinal herbs, paracelsus called lemon balm the ‘elixir of life.’